Saturday, January 24, 2004

FRBR Catalog

Morbus Iff is working on a catalog based on FRBR, LibDB. He has been quite active lately on the FRBR mail-list. Here is his description of the project
An open-sourced Perl/MySQL library and asset management system based on and inspired by the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records, triples from the semantic web, and "the end-user doesn't, and shouldn't, need to know this stuff". In English, this means that you'll be able to smartly and easily catalog your movies, books, magazines, comics, etc. into your own computerized "personal library".
If you would like to keep up with the project as it develops there is a wiki. The wiki does have a page of readings that is useful. Seen at Library Stuff.

Friday, January 23, 2004

Unshelved

No catalogers in the strip yet, but still worth supporting.
We're excited to announce our second collection, What Would Dewey Do?. In addition to a year''s worth of Unshelved strips the book also contains an introduction by Nancy Pearl (best known, for better or for worse, as the model for the Librarian Action Figure), "Conference Tips" strips from ALA Midwinter Meeting 2004, "What Did You Do For Your Summer Vacation" from Bumbershoot 2003, and the ALL-NEW "How We Make Unshelved", a two-page comic revealing the secret success strategy (say that ten times fast) of Bill and Gene.

MARC 21 Format for Community Information

Update No. 4 (October 2003) to the MARC 21 Format for Community Information is now available from the Library of Congress. It includes changes made to the community information format resulting from proposals which were considered by the ALA ALCTS/LITA/RUSA Machine-Readable Bibliographic Information Committee (MARBI) at its 2003 meetings, the Canadian Committee on MARC (CCM) at its meetings in 2003 and by the Book Industry Communications/Bibliographic Standards Technical Subgroup (BIC/BSTS) at its 2003 meetings. This update features important new information including:
  • Addition of Appendix G: Organization Code Sources
  • Improved descriptions of content designators
  • Updated examples
Does anyone use this format? A while back we were looking at formats for this kind of information and decided that GILS would be a better choice. The project was never finished but in my work I found very few examples of this in use.

MARC 21 Format for Holdings Data

Update No. 4 (October 2003) to the MARC 21 Format for Holdings Data is now available from the Library of Congress. It includes changes made to the holdings format resulting from proposals which were considered by the ALA ALCTS/LITA/RUSA Machine-Readable Bibliographic Information Committee (MARBI) at its 2003 meetings, the Canadian Committee on MARC (CCM) at its meetings in 2003 and by the Book Industry Communications/Bibliographic Standards Technical Subgroup (BIC/BSTS) at its 2003 meetings. This update features important new information including:
  • Addition of field 538 (System Details Note)
  • Addition of Appendix G: Organization Code Sources
  • Updated examples
  • Improved descriptions of content designators

MARC 21 Format for Classification

Update No. 4 (October 2003) to the MARC 21 Format for Classification Data is now available from the Library of Congress. It includes changes made to the classification format resulting from proposals which were considered by the ALA ALCTS/LITA/RUSA Machine-Readable Bibliographic Information Committee (MARBI) at its 2003 meetings, the Canadian Committee on MARC (CCM) at its meetings in 2003 and by the Book Industry Communications/Bibliographic Standards Technical Subgroup (BIC/BSTS) at its 2003 meetings. This update features important new information including:
  • Addition of subfield code $0 (Record control number) in field 748 (Index Term-Chronological)
  • Addition of Appendix F: Organization Code Sources
  • Updated examples
  • Improved descriptions of content designators

MARC 21 Format for Authority Data

Update No. 4 (October 2003) to the MARC 21 Format for Authority Data is now available from the Library of Congress. It includes changes made to the authority format resulting from proposals which were considered by the ALA ALCTS/LITA/RUSA Machine-Readable Bibliographic Information Committee (MARBI) at its 2003 meetings, the Canadian Committee on MARC (CCM) at its meetings in 2003 and by the Book Industry Communications/Bibliographic Standards Technical Subgroup (BIC/BSTS) at its 2003 meetings. This update features important new information including:
  • Addition of field 024 (Other Standard Identifier)
  • Addition of Appendix G: Organization Code Sources
  • Updated examples
  • Improved descriptions of content designators

MARC 21 Format for Bibliographic Data

Update No. 4 (October 2003) to the MARC 21 Format for Bibliographic Data is now available from the Library of Congress. It includes changes made to the bibliographic format resulting from proposals which were considered by the ALA ALCTS/LITA/RUSA Machine-Readable Bibliographic Information Committee (MARBI) at its 2003 meetings, the Canadian Committee on MARC (CCM) at its meetings in 2003 and by the Book Industry Communications/Bibliographic Standards Technical Subgroup (BIC/BSTS) at its 2003 meetings. This update features important new information including:
  • Addition of field 365 (Trade price)
  • Addition of field 366 (Trade availability information)
  • Addition of Appendix I: Organization Code Sources
  • Updated examples
  • Improved descriptions of content designators

Thursday, January 22, 2004

Open Source Tool

pyCatalog is a Python, MySQL, wxPython, Reportlab application specifically usable in library and information centers. It simply produces book catalog and card catalog in pdf format rendered using reportlab. The program takes MARC file as its source data. It is platform independent, it will run on Windows, Linux and Mac operating system.

Seen on oss4lib.

Effective Practices

As catalogers we have long known the value of sharing information. OCLC, RLG and before that the printed LC cards have all made our collections more available to our users and saved us time. Here is another method of sharing knowledge and saving time and effort, the ACRL Effective Practices Clearinghouse.
The Association of College & Research Libraries' (ACRL) Effective Practices Committee is accepting submissions for its web-based clearinghouse for effective practices in academic libraries. The Effective Practices web site can be found at www.acrl.org/effectivepractices. The clearinghouse will document practices from all areas of academic libraries; we're looking for examples of procedures or tools that have been developed to (for example) streamline workflow, solve problems or improve services.

An effective practice is:

  • aligned with the library's and parent organization's mission
  • sustainable, cost-effective and has the potential for long-term impact on the library and its constituents
An effective practice has:
  • outcomes that are measurable
  • some degree of transferability
Effective practices can be submitted at www.acrl.org/effectivepractices. Practices are then reviewed to see if they meet the criteria listed above. Once accepted, ACRL will post the practice on the web site and send the submitting library a letter acknowledging its contribution to the Effective Practices clearinghouse.

As more effective practices are submitted and the clearinghouse grows, academic librarians looking for ideas to improve specific practices in their own libraries or just shopping for good ideas will be able to browse by category and search by keyword.

Tuesday, January 20, 2004

MARC Tools

David A. Christensen has created and made available on CPAN a collection of Perl/Tk widgets for editing MARC::Record objects. Thanks David for making these tools available to the community.

Monday, January 19, 2004

Digital Libraries

A Survey of Digital Library Aggregation Services by Martha L. Brogan. Digital Library Federation, Council on Library and Information Resources: Washington DC, December 2003. [And available in print, 1st quarter 2004]

This 100-page report, commissioned by the DLF, provides an overview of a diverse set of more than thirty digital library aggregation services, organizes them into functional clusters, and then evaluates them more fully from the perspective of an informed user. Most of the services under review rely wholly or partially on the Protocol for Metadata Harvesting of the Open Archives Initiative (OAI-PMH). Each service is annotated with its organizational affiliation, subject coverage, function, audience, status, and size. Critical issues surrounding each of these elements are presented in order to provide the reader with an appreciation of the nuances inherent in seemingly straightforward factual information, such as "audience" or "size."