Tuesday, February 07, 2006

Serial Title Changes

"My Highly Opinionated Note About ISSN" by Judy C. Holoviak of the American Geophysical Union discusses the problem with the current rules for title change and the resulting change in ISSN and OpenURL problems. It appears in the latest issue of the Geoscience Information Society Newsletter.
You may ask, "Why did our ISSN center feel compelled to change the number that had originally been assigned by them to JGR?" I certainly did. The answer was tied to the fact that AGU changed the cover design when the trim size of AGU journals was increased from roughly 6 x 10 to today's size in order to cut costs. With the additional real estate we decided to add what we thought - and still think - was a design element: the big block letters J G R. We did not change the title of the journal. (We had been sensitized by our colleagues in the library community about the problems created by title changes.) The LoC told us otherwise. Because the design element contains letters and was the largest thing on the cover, they, not AGU, changed the name of the Journal of Geophysical Research to JGR Journal of Geophysical Research and a change in the 'key title' triggered a change in the ISSN.
Not yet available on the Web site.

2 comments:

walt said...

I recall a LONG time ago, when one of ALA's publication (I think College & Research Libraries, but that could be wrong) was redesigning its cover, they spent considerable time assuring that the new "initialism" graphic would not be sufficiently prominent to trigger a "title change." So, while this continues to be a peculiar problem (shouldn't the title be whatever's in the masthead?), it's not a new one.

eric said...

JGR poses a huge problem for link resolvers because of AGU's peculiar insistance that the different sections of JGR should have one and only on issn.
JGR - Atmospheres
JGR - Biogeosciences
JGR - Earth Surface
JGR - Oceans
JGR - Planets
JGR - Solid Earth
JGR - Space Physics


libraries can subscribe to the sections separately, and the web people at AGU consider these to be separate journals. Unique among journals as far as I know.